adventures in heideland

significobs:

Artist Mike Stilkey uses the covers of books reclaimed from library trash heaps as a canvas for his whimsical paintings.

He works with a mix of ink, colored pencil, paint and lacquer to create each artwork that can vary from anthropomorphic animals playing instruments to portraits of men and women inspired by Weimar-era German expressionism.

More: New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey | Colossal

One man’s trash…

…you haint no objections to sharing a harpooner’s blanket, have ye?

Better sleep with a sober cannibal than a drunken Christian.

Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, Or, The Whale

An ongoing list of things I didn’t expect while reading Moby-Dick:
1) humor

140427 Moby Ready, Or, the Launch of the Summer of The Whale 

This summer I’ll be reading the literary classic “Moby Dick, Or, The Whale” by Herman Melville. I’ve already begun my analog record, “Moby-Notebook”, using a Nov. 2013 Field Notes Brand “Cold Horizon” Ltd. Ed. notebook; which, though not listed in the Practical Applications section of the inside back cover, seemed entirely fitting for Whaling Adventure Tale Commentary [after all, Melville himself wrote, “A Polar wind blows through it, and birds of prey hover over it.”]. 

As it’s always a pleasure to read a beautifully made book, I chose the drop dead gorgeous Penguin Drop Caps edition of “Moby-Dick” (publ. 2013), marking progress with an appropriately themed Anchor Bookmark / 6” ruler from Night Owl Paper Goods. 

Our companion volume on this reading journey is Dan Beachy-Quick’s “A Whaler’s Dictionary” (Mpls: Milkweed Eds, 2008), which I hope will be helpful for explicating all the whaling arcana in Melville’s weighty tome. 

We set sail 1 May 2014. Follow along on twitter via hashtag #TCMoby and the blog Beth Babbles About Books: #TCMoby. I’ll also try to post a few progress reports here on tumblr.

140427 Moby Ready, Or, the Launch of the Summer of The Whale

This summer I’ll be reading the literary classic “Moby Dick, Or, The Whale” by Herman Melville. I’ve already begun my analog record, “Moby-Notebook”, using a Nov. 2013 Field Notes Brand “Cold Horizon” Ltd. Ed. notebook; which, though not listed in the Practical Applications section of the inside back cover, seemed entirely fitting for Whaling Adventure Tale Commentary [after all, Melville himself wrote, “A Polar wind blows through it, and birds of prey hover over it.”].

As it’s always a pleasure to read a beautifully made book, I chose the drop dead gorgeous Penguin Drop Caps edition of “Moby-Dick” (publ. 2013), marking progress with an appropriately themed Anchor Bookmark / 6” ruler from Night Owl Paper Goods.

Our companion volume on this reading journey is Dan Beachy-Quick’s “A Whaler’s Dictionary” (Mpls: Milkweed Eds, 2008), which I hope will be helpful for explicating all the whaling arcana in Melville’s weighty tome.

We set sail 1 May 2014. Follow along on twitter via hashtag #TCMoby and the blog Beth Babbles About Books: #TCMoby. I’ll also try to post a few progress reports here on tumblr.

I’d like to smell this object.

"Maybe the world was like a revolving door, it occurred to him as his consciousness was fading away. And which section you ended up in was just a matter of where your foot happened to fall." — Haruki Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, p. 411
131208 The [Analog] Bookshelfie Project 

a book based on a digital project based on analog Fuji Instax photos

131208 The [Analog] Bookshelfie Project

a book based on a digital project based on analog Fuji Instax photos

131129 The Bookshelfie Project, a set on Flickr.The Bookshelfie Project* was inspired by a Twitter exchange with @ColinCorneau. Keeping the ‘H’ in shelfie. *Excludes coffee table books.
Bookshelfie N°2Bookshelfie N°3Bookshelfie N°4Bookshelfie N°5

131129 The Bookshelfie Project, a set on Flickr.

The Bookshelfie Project* was inspired by a Twitter exchange with @ColinCorneau. Keeping the ‘H’ in shelfie. *Excludes coffee table books.
♥ this project — Reading Cabin by Marta Wengoroviusvia Dezeen.com

♥ this project — Reading Cabin by Marta Wengorovius
via Dezeen.com

The Joyce scholars, with notable exceptions, were characteristically aghast, like a consternation of moles caught in a bright light.
I write one page of masterpiece to ninety one pages of shit. I try to put the shit in the wastebasket.
Hemingway to Fitzgerald. Oh the writer’s life.
From Letters of Note
Bookclub Serenity Now!

Funny how the thing that used to bug me most about my former bookclub is the thing that puzzles me most about my current, otherwise HIGHLY entertaining bookclub. That is -

“I haven’t read the book, but… [insert lengthy soliloquy on topic at best tangentially related to the book].”

Clarification: I’m not troubled by bookclub readers who give it a go, read a respectable chunk, can’t finish or otherwise invoke the “life’s too short” escape clause. I’ve been there myself and am totally okay w/ readers who want to discuss a book they’ve given a fair shake. No, I’m talking about the people who attend a bookclub meeting when they Haven’t. Even. Started. The. Book.

Who are these people? Are they wannabe readers too shy to take that first hit and risk becoming literary addicts? Undecideds too terrified to plunge in w/out a focus group of advance readers to assure them it’s okay? Are they lonely people who just want to talk? Are they book-voyeurs who take pleasure in hearing other people discuss books? Are they some sort of cosmic joke played on each and every bookclub in existence? The “evil” anti-reader?

And what do they do after the bookclub meeting? Do they read the books? Or do they feel they’ve now absorbed it by osmosis; the readers’ discussion substituting for any need to actually read the book?*

What used to gnaw at me and generate a (false) righteous anger now simply bewilders me; the anti-reader as much a bookclub archetype as the English Major and the struggling writer. I’ve gone from a place of high-horse resentment to one of fascinated curiosity. What makes these non-readers who attend bookclubs tick? What’s their deal anyway?

*Cf. “I didn’t read the book, but I saw the film.”
Brazilian cable car transformed into a…. LIBRARY!
foto & post via Pop-Up City

Brazilian cable car transformed into a…. LIBRARY!

foto & post via Pop-Up City